How To Save For Retirement When You’re Self Employed: The Solo 401k

Have you ever heard of the Solo 401k plan? The Solo 401k is the most tax efficient way for small business owners, consultants and contractors to save money for their retirement.

The Solo 401k plan is an IRS approved retirement plan which is suited for business owners who do not have any employees, other than themselves or their spouse.

Designed Uniquely For The Self Employed Individual.

If you’re self employed, you know how crucial it is to maintain financial security for yourself and your family. The Solo 401k offers powerful and exclusive features not found in traditional 401k or IRA retirement plans.

Are you sick of being forced to invest in Wall Street stocks and mutual funds? Are you ready to invest in any and all opportunities as you see fit? If you answered yes, then a Solo 401k is just what you need!

What Are The Features That Make A Solo 401k So Unique?

In addition to the tremendous 401k benefits (tax free profits, high tax contribution deductions, asset protection and estate planning), the Solo 401k also allows you to invest tax free in virtually anything.

Popular Solo 401k investments include: real estate, private businesses, public stocks, private stocks, and even cryptocurrency. You can also borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of the account value for any purpose.

Besides letting you make high contributions (up to $60,000 for 2017) and borrow between $1,000 to $50,000 (tax free), the Solo 401k plan offers you the same investment opportunities as a Self-Directed IRA LLC. But without having to hire a custodian or create an LLC (both of which are costly ventures.)

Note: The money you borrow from a Solo 401k is lent to you at the current prime rate + 1%.

Disadvantages Of Solo 401k’s.

As you read above, Solo 401k’s have high contribution amounts. Naturally, this doesn’t go unnoticed by the people who manage these 401k’s. Which means they want a piece of your cake.

Most firms charge between $100 to $500 to setup a Solo 401k. After that, you can expect to pay annual fees of up to $500. So you don’t want to get a Solo 401k unless you intend to contribute tens of thousands of dollars as soon as you open one.

And then there’s the IRS you have to deal with. With Solo 401k’s you don’t have to file any paperwork annually unless you have $250,000 or more in your 401k (form 5500-EZ). When you take a distribution, you will have to file a form 1099-R with the IRS.

Good luck investing!

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